CO-EXISTENCE

Human-Elephant Conflict is a significant conservation and poverty issue in Africa. It threatens elephant populations through retaliatory killings and increased hostility towards elephants, leading to tolerance of poaching. It harms the livelihoods of farmers, as crop-raiding results into reduced food security. It also deteriorates relations between communities and wildlife authorities.

Our project guides the local community to use non-lethal methods to reduce conflicts with elephants, reduce crop losses and diversify local economic livelihoods- a win-win solution for both the community by reducing crop losses from elephant and conserving biodiversity.

Nyerere Bees & Elephant Conservation Project

At 30,893 km2, Nyerere National Park (part of former Selous Game Reserve) is the country’s largest national park located in the south of Tanzania. At the north, the park is connected with Wami Mbiki-Jukumu/Nyerere wildlife corridor which connect the northern and southern Tanzania elephant sub-populations. However, this corridor has been threatened by human activities such as human settlement, agriculture, livestock and deforestation (Mkuburo et al., 2020 unpublished). 

Interestingly, elephants in transit within the corridor are known to have entered the military forest (the forest used by Tanzania Defence Force, 92KJ and 121KJ for military training) around Ngerengere areas due to the blockage of the corridor. They have been staying and reproduced in the military forest for some years now (at least 10 years), and their population number has increased to an estimated 100 or more individuals. These elephants have caused huge crop-raiding and human casualties around the areas in Mgude, Kisemo and Kidugalo/Pulambili villages, as well as threatening the lives of schoolchildren who are studying to the nearest school villages. Other villages include Kisaki and Gomero at the northern boundary of Nyerere National Park.

This project aims at enhancing peaceful co-existence between people and elephant through facilitation of community-led projects that increase and diversify incomes, reduce crop losses from elephant, and conserve biodiversity in Mgude, Kisemo and Kisaki villages.

Via registered farmers groups, the beehive fence project is strengthening community with the ability for mitigating human-elephant conflict, increase local incomes from tourism by developing a human-elephant coexistence tourism package featuring visits to the beehive fence projectsand provide the added advantage of honey to harvest and sell, allowing farmers to benefit from additional income generated from honey. Therefore, by mitigating human-elephant conflict increase positive attitudes towards elephants and conservation.

Beekeeping project (training) increase protection of bee foraging zones such as woodlands and riparian habitats with benefits to agriculture and livelihoods.

The Maisha na Tembo (Lives with Elephants) farmers groups (community bank) increase access to financial services with access to loans and buffer financial losses through alternative income apart from farming activities. It also to increase community capacity to manage a community bank and benefit from entrepreneurship opportunities.

Tinga Tinga Beehive Fence Project

In partnership with Shumata camp and Enduimet Wildlife Management Area (WMA), we also guides the local community in Tinga Tinga village found adjacent to Enduimet WMA in Longido district, Arusha on the use non-lethal methods to reduce conflicts with elephants, reduce crop losses and diversify local economic livelihoods- a win-win solution for both the community by reducing crop losses from elephant and conserving biodiversity.